History of the CPMA

Up to 2016, more than 6'500 babies have been born following treatments carried out by the CPMA Lausanne.

The activity of the CPMA team began in 1987 with the initiative of Dr. Marc Germond (gynecologist) and Dr. Alfred Senn (biologist). Following a specialized training in medically assisted procreation in Australia, Dr. Germond created the Reproductive Medicine Unit within the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University Hospital in Lausanne, where he was appointed Associate Professor in 2002 The team consisted of gynecologists, biologists, laboratory technicians, nurses and secretaries. The field of data processing developed rapidly, for the management of clinical and research data. Also, a specific concept of psychological counsellingDiscussion with a specialized professional in which information, advice and support are provided. was put in place, thanks to close collaboration with the family planning and liaison psychiatry teams.

From 1999 onwards, the team continued its activity on two sites: in the private setting of the Center for Procreation Medically Assisted CPMA in Lausanne and at the university hospital.

As of September 2005, all the activity takes place within the framework of the CPMA only. The specialization of this team allowed to consolidate the prospect of excellence for clinical and biological management in the CPMA, in close collaboration with the laboratory of andrologyMedical specialty (from the Greek andros, man) who takes care of the man's health, especially for the problems of the male reproductive system. (Fertas) directed by Dr. Fabien Murisier, and scientific research programs (FABER Foundation). The combination of these three axes of competence, called the Tripod, gave rise to the influence of the CPMA in the field of medically assisted procreation at the national and international levels. Quality monitoring was implemented by Dr Alain Chanson, Quality Manager, since 1997. The accreditation of the laboratory of reproductive biology (Fertisupport) and the certification of the CPMA are accomplished and managed according to the ISO standards. Thus, the CPMA brings together, in one location, experienced specialists in fertility problems. Six gynecologists, a urologist, eight laboratory biologists and technicians, and two psychological counsellors ensure that couples receive care in a comprehensive manner, while respecting their specific characteristics.

Since the retirement of Dr. Alfred Senn in 2011, Dr. Françoise Urner heads the Fertisupport laboratory.

On the medical side, Dr. Daniel Wirthner took over the management of the CPMA in December 2014.

Always concerned with improving the quality of care, CPMA participated in a very important research project on the quality of spermEjaculated spermatozoa and secretions during the male orgasm. in young men in Switzerland: launched 10 years ago as part of a national research program and currently taken up by the University of Geneva. In addition, the CPMA participates in other clinical research projects to optimize available techniques, simplify therapeutic management and improve treatments.

Since 2013, the CPMA actively participates in the Medisupport laboratory network, which includes Fertas (laboratory of IVFIVF or In Vitro Fertilization: Fertilization outside of the body, for which one induces with gonadotrophins the development of several ovarian follicles. The oocytes (eggs) arrive at maturity and are taken from the ovary by surgical puncture and mixed 4-6 hours later with the sperm of the partner (or ICSI is performed to introduce one spermatozoa in each oocyte). To allow cell division, the fertilized eggs are kept from 2 to 6 days in a protected environment (incubator). The embryos are then transferred into the uterus of the patient for implantation. and andrologyMedical specialty (from the Greek andros, man) who takes care of the man's health, especially for the problems of the male reproductive system.), as well as Polyanalytic (blood analyses) and Aurigen (genetics). The CPMA works closely with the Hirslanden Group's Cecil Clinic, the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), the cantonal hospitals of Neuchâtel (HNE) and Fribourg (HFR), as well as an extensive network of doctors throughout the French-speaking Switzerland. Multiple partnerships for optimal care.

In 2017, the new Swiss Act on Medically Assisted Procreation (LPMAThe Swiss Law on Medically Assisted Procreation (2001).) entails some changes in clinical practice, in particular the possibility of allowing 12 embryos to evolve (instead of 3) in prolonged culture, and to carry out pre-implantationInstallation of the embryo in the uterine lining. diagnosis (PGDPGD or preimplantation genetic diagnosis. A genetic test performed on cells taken from an embryo obtained through in vitro fertilization. It allows to verify if the embryo presents a genetic illness for which the future parents are genetic carriers (cystic fibrosis, myasthenia, etc.)). The possible duration of cryopreservationProcess for the preservation of eggs and sperm by freezing. Thanks to the cryopreservation of zygotes the risk of multi-fetal pregnancy after IVF and ICSI can be reduced and the patient doest not need to repeat the hormonal stimulation and the collection of oocytes. for gametesMale and female reproductive cells *: spermatozoa and eggs. and cryopreserved embryos is also extended from 5 to 10 years. The CPMA has acquired an innovative device with time-lapse technology (EmbryoScope + ®), allowing to incubate and to follow the development of the embryos under even more optimal conditions.

In 2018, since the retirement of Dr. Françoise Urner, Dr. Fabien Murisier took over the management of the IVFIVF or In Vitro Fertilization: Fertilization outside of the body, for which one induces with gonadotrophins the development of several ovarian follicles. The oocytes (eggs) arrive at maturity and are taken from the ovary by surgical puncture and mixed 4-6 hours later with the sperm of the partner (or ICSI is performed to introduce one spermatozoa in each oocyte). To allow cell division, the fertilized eggs are kept from 2 to 6 days in a protected environment (incubator). The embryos are then transferred into the uterus of the patient for implantation. laboratories. Dr Charlotte Coat is appointed head of the Lausanne laboratory.

CPMA, Rue de la Vigie 5, 1003 Lausanne, tél: 021 321 15 80